Do It Yourself

Helpful Products and Ideas for Your Life

Dog Proof Garbage Cans for the Kitchen are Essential!

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Keep Dogs Out of the Trash

I’m definitely a dog person.  I’ve had them as pets for most of my life.  (If you’ve got a minute, read about my goldendoodle clipping experience)  I’ve noticed something though, even the best dogs seem to reach their limit of self control when it comes to good smelling human food.  Personally, I’ve found that purchasing  dog proof trash cans will go a long way toward keeping my furry friends out of troubledog proof trash cans.  The key to buying a dog proof kitchen trash can seems to be finding one that has a lid that is heavy enough to resist prying noses.  If you try to simply purchase one of those cheap bins with a plastic flap on top, Fido will make short work of getting to the scraps you threw away after dinner.  If you want to keep dogs out of indoor trash cans, you’ve got to be smarter than your dog!  Your pet doesn’t have your discriminating tastes.  They don’t get the concept of “garbage” when there’s a bunch of perfectly edible dinner scraps sitting right in front of their nose!

Dog Proofing Tools for Your Home

Here are two very handy products.  The first is a garbage can that’s meant to keep pets out and garbage in.  The lid closes tight and opens when you step on the pedal.  The second product is actually meant for storing your dog’s food.  I wanted to include this because a lot of people have problems with their dogs going after their food supply when they aren’t supposed to be eating.  A container like this also helps to keep unwanted critters from getting into your dog’s food supply.

 simplehuman 50L-Liter / 13-Gallon Semi-Round Step Trash Can, Black Plastic simplehuman 30-Liter Pet Food Storage Can, Brushed Stainless Steel

Take Care of Your Dog

Another thought on dogs for the day is how important it is to keep a current ID tag on them.  I’m talking about the kind of tag that has the dog’s name and the phone number(s) to call to contact the owner in the event that the dog gets separated from its family.  I recently found a rather old dog wandering around my yard looking lost.  It was extremely friendly, and my kids wanted to adopt it, but I figured that someone would be missing it soon because it did have a vaccination tag  and a little bell on its collar.  The problem was, the clinic that provided the tag was closed for the weekend and that was the only phone number I could find.  After walking around door to door with the dog for quite a while, we did eventually get it reunited with its owner, but things would have been much simpler if there had been a phone number to call the minute the dog was found.  I’m not writing this to chastise anyone, but to remind them.  I actually realized that day that only one of my two dogs has such a tag on its collar.  Getting a new tag with contact info is on the short term to do list for this week.

How Much Does Your Dog Eat, Really?

Finally, I thought I’d mention something that others might be dealing with.  For about a year, I could not understand how my dogs were getting fat.  I’d actually been giving them less food than was recommended on the bag, but their weight kept increasing.  Finally, I started watching them from inside the house.  It seems that they’d gotten into a routine of getting treats from several of my dog loving neighbors who were meeting them at the fence.  I talked to the neighbors (nicely) and they cut back the treats a bit.  Suddenly the dogs were getting back into shape.  If your dog is mysteriously gaining weight, you might want to ask the neighbors if they’ve been handing out treats to them (but be polite about it!)


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